CANCELED: TNT Drops ‘Dallas’

Dallas, TNT

The end?

TNT has canceled “Dallas,” more than a week after the series concluded its third season.

The revival of the 1978-91 CBS classic got off to a promising start, debuting in June 2012 with almost 7 million viewers. Ratings dropped when TNT brought the series back the following winter in a tough time slot, a few months after the death of iconic star Larry Hagman.

The show’s stars took to Twitter tonight after TNT announced the news. “Thank all of you wonderful fans for your love and support for these past 3 seasons. We were just canceled. So sad!” wrote Linda Gray.

Tweeted Emma Bell: “Thank you for all the well wishes. It was an honor to be apart of @Dallas_TNT grateful to be a family with such a wonderful cast and crew!”

The “Dallas” writers have been penning scripts for a fourth season, in case the series was renewed. In an interview last week, executive producer Cynthia Cidre discussed plans to bring back a fan favorite from the original show and introduce J.R.’s secret daughter, whose existence was revealed during the third-season finale.

It isn’t clear if Warner Bros., the studio that produces “Dallas,” will shop the series to another home. Keep reading Dallas Decoder for additional coverage in the coming days.

What’s your reaction to “Dallas’s” cancellation? Share your comments below and read more news from Dallas Decoder.

Critique: TNT’s ‘Dallas’ Episode 40 — ‘Brave New World’

Brave New World, Dallas, John Ross Ewing, Josh Henderson, TNT, Which Ewing Dies?

Going down

Throughout “Dallas’s” third season, John Ross strives to honor J.R. without becoming him. He wears Daddy’s wristwatch and belt buckle and embarks on one ambitious scheme after another, hoping to emulate J.R.’s business successes without repeating his personal failures. Nothing goes according to plan, of course, and by the end of the season’s final hour, “Brave New World,” John Ross has lost his company, his wife and his family’s goodwill. In a climactic scene, the young man who was so eager to be a better man than J.R. — the son who previously slammed his hand on Sue Ellen’s kitchen counter and insisted he wasn’t his father — stands before her and Uncle Bobby and repeats this assertion, this time with a caveat. “I’m not just like my father,” John Ross says. “I’m worse.”

Chilling? Yes, but also poignant. The truth is, John Ross isn’t worse than J.R. Not by a long shot. John Ross is more heroic than his father, as we see at the beginning of “Brave New World,” when he defeats the drug cartel and tries to avenge Emma’s rape by nearly killing Luis. John Ross is also much more emotional than J.R., which we witness during this episode’s elevator scene, when — having lost it all — he collapses in tears and listens to an old voice mail in which J.R. says he’s proud of him. How could anyone this sensitive be worse than J.R.? Maybe the setbacks John Ross experienced this season will harden him and make him as cruel and as calculating as his father, but he’s not there yet.

Regardless of how bad John Ross becomes, there’s no denying how good Josh Henderson is at articulating his character’s complexities. Henderson allows us to feel John Ross’s vein-popping rage in “Brave New World’s” opening scene, when John Ross slams Luis to the floor, digs a gun barrel into his face and screams, “You regret what you did to her now? Huh?” Henderson offers a different kind of anger in the scene with Bobby and Sue Ellen, when he doesn’t deliver the “I’m worse” line as much as he growls it. At the other end of the spectrum, there’s the elevator scene, which is moving not just because we hear Larry Hagman’s voice, but also because we see Henderson’s tears. (By the way: J.R.’s voice mail comes from a phone conversation between him and John Ross in the first-season episode “The Price You Pay,” and the song that plays when John Ross begins weeping was written and performed by Henderson. Is there anything he can’t do?)

If John Ross’s elevator breakdown supplies “Brave New World” with its emotional high point, what is there to say about Christopher’s death at the end of the episode? Even though TNT’s promos warned us a Ewing would die, this is still a shocking moment. Much of the credit goes to Jordana Brewster, whose anguish is palpable when Elena sees Christopher’s car blow up with him inside. (And yes, that is supposed to be Christopher, even though we don’t actually see Jesse Metcalfe get behind the wheel.) Nevertheless, this doesn’t feel like the blaze-of-glory exit the heroic Christopher deserves. Is the audience supposed to admire him for dying while helping Elena? Sorry, but I can’t fathom why he remains so devoted to her after all the terrible choices she’s made. I recognize killing off Metcalfe opens lots of new storytelling avenues for this series, but I can’t help but wish Elena had been the one to blow up instead.

Christopher’s death puts a grisly punctuation mark on this season’s better-than-expected drug cartel storyline. There’s also a nifty musical montage in which the braided henchman Jacobo kills Luis and El Pozolero in their jail cell before a cane-wielding Nicolas is revealed as the mastermind behind the murders. (The cool song that powers this sequence: Eric Church’s “Devil, Devil.”) Other highlights include Mitch Pileggi’s beautiful performance when Harris professes his love for Ann, as well as Elena and Nicolas’s dramatic showdown, although I wish she hadn’t shot him. Now virtually every leading lady on this show has plugged someone. Likewise, I could do without Judith Light’s mugging when John Ross tells Bobby and Sue Ellen he’s worse than J.R. — a scene that should’ve been reserved for Ewings only. (And isn’t it funny how the elevator doors open and reveal Judith at the precise moment John Ross announces she’s the new railroad commissioner?)

Criticisms aside, “Brave New World,” which comes from scriptwriter Robert Rovner and director Steve Robin, brings the third season to a satisfying conclusion and resets the table for “Dallas’s” fourth year — and TNT willing, there’ll be one. The scene where Bobby and Sue Ellen foil Pamela’s plan to reclaim Ewing Global is heartening because it suggests the Barnes/Ewing feud isn’t over, despite what Pamela told Cliff a few episodes ago. I especially like how Pamela accuses her in-laws of screwing her over like Jock cheated Digger. (Is she wrong?) The other promising development: the addition of Tracey McKay to the Bobby/Ann/Harris triangle — especially if it means Tracey and Harris will join forces against the newly reconciled couple.

“Dallas’s” most intriguing new storyline, of course, is John Ross’s discovery that J.R. has a secret daughter. Like all “Dallas” fans, I have lots of questions about this one, beginning with the obvious: Who’s the mama? I figured the young woman would turn out to be the product of J.R.’s marriage to Cally, although executive producer Cynthia Cidre tells Dallas Decoder the daughter’s mother is dead. (Cally is still alive in this “Dallas” universe, or at least she was when she showed up at J.R.’s funeral last season.) Will the mother turn out to be J.R.’s longtime secretary Sly, who slept with him shortly before he fired her at the end of the original series? What if Kristin Shepard didn’t suffer a miscarriage after J.R. impregnated her in 1980? Could the daughter be the product of J.R.’s romp with Katherine Wentworth, who may or may not be lurking around somewhere? The mind reels.

More questions: How is John Ross going to use the existence of a half-sister to his advantage? You might think someone like him wouldn’t want other siblings hanging around, especially if there’s a possibility they could stake a claim on his inheritance. On the other hand, he must have something up his sleeve. How else to explain his toast to J.R. and his “Thank you, Daddy” line in the final shot? (Is this a nod to the classic scene where J.R. gazes at the heavens and thanks Jock after sneaking a peek at his will?) There’s also the question of where John Ross’s sister will fit into “Dallas’s” romantic sphere. If she likes guys, she doesn’t have a lot of options among the show’s main cast members, does she? If, however, she likes gals, there are a few tantalizing possibilities. This could be fertile new storytelling terrain for “Dallas,” although I’m not sure the show would want to go that route after the uproar over John Ross, Pamela and Emma’s threesome this year.

Then again, maybe that’s all the more reason to do it.

Grade: B

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Brave New World, Christopher Ewing, Dallas, Jesse Metcalfe, TNT, Which Ewing Dies?

Hot wheel

‘BRAVE NEW WORLD’

Season 3, Episode 15

Telecast: September 22, 2014

Audience: 1.72 million viewers on September 22

Writer: Robert Rovner

Director: Steve Robin

Synopsis: John Ross’s commandos rescue him and the Mexican police arrest El Pozolero and Luis, who are later murdered in their jail cells by Nicolas’s henchman. When the government seizes the cartel’s Ewing Global assets, Pamela plans to buy them back, but Bobby and Sue Ellen beat her to the punch, infuriating both John Ross and Pamela. Bobby and Ann reconcile, but she becomes alarmed when she finds him comforting a grieving Tracey. Elena realizes Nicolas is responsible for Drew’s death and shoots Nicolas in a fit of anger, but he escapes. John Ross walks in on Pamela and Nasir in bed and later forms an alliance with Judith, who returns Candace’s blue dress to him, replaces Bobby on the railroad commission, and gets her hands on Harris’s tape of her drug deals. Emma gives one of Harris’s secret files to John Ross, who discovers J.R. has a daughter and tells Bum to find her. Elena learns she’s pregnant and is getting ready to leave a gas station when a car bomb planted by another one of Nicolas’s henchmen goes off, killing Christopher.

Cast: Emma Bell (Emma Ryland), Jordana Brewster (Elena Ramos), Melinda Clarke (Tracey McKay), Juan Pablo Di Pace (Nicolas Treviño), Akari Draco (Sheriff Derrick), Patrick Duffy (Bobby Ewing), Julie Gonzalo (Pamela Ewing), Linda Gray (Sue Ellen Ewing), Larry Hagman (J.R. Ewing), Josh Henderson (John Ross Ewing), Antonio Jaramillo (Luis), Judith Light (Judith Ryland), Jesse Metcalfe (Christopher Ewing), Kevin Page (Bum), Pete Partida (Jacobo), Gino Anthony Pesi (George Tatangelo), Mitch Pileggi (Harris Ryland), Carlos Sandoval (El Pozolero), Brenda Strong (Ann Ewing), Mikal Vega (Walter)

“Brave New World” is available at DallasTNT.com, Amazon and iTunes. Watch the episode and share your comments below.

The Dallas Decoder Interview: Cynthia Cidre

Cynthia Cidre, Dallas, TNT, Which Ewing Dies?

Cynthia Cidre

Spoiler alert! “Dallas” fans are still reeling from this week’s season finale, in which Christopher (Jesse Metcalfe) was killed when his car blew up and John Ross (Josh Henderson) learned J.R. has a secret daughter. I spoke with executive producer Cynthia Cidre about the cliffhangers — and what fans will see if “Dallas” returns next year.

Is Christopher really dead?

Yes. Believe me, we thought about teasing that: Did he die? Did he not die? And then, because I knew he was going to be dead for sure, I just felt dirty about doing that. It didn’t feel honest. So I thought the explosion was pretty big, and pretty definite — although I’m told all the blogs are saying he’s not really dead.

Yeah, the readers on my site are filling up the comments section with all kinds of theories.

That’s fun. I’ve got to read that.

But why kill a Ewing?

Well, we aim to surprise everybody — always. We like doing what you don’t see coming at the end of every season. I thought we did that well in Season 1, when we found out Rebecca was Pamela Barnes, and then we had Season 2 end with Elena finding out J.R. cheated her father. We always want to do the unexpected. And what would people expect less than if you actually killed off one of your main characters?

Christopher Ewing, Dallas, Endgame, Jesse Metcalfe, TNT, Which Ewing Dies?

Swan song

Why Christopher?

If you really think about it, there were really only two options. I couldn’t kill Sue Ellen or Bobby because somebody might kill me. I couldn’t kill John Ross because the show is really on Josh’s shoulders since Larry [Hagman] died. That left Ann and Christopher. Whose death would have the bigger impact? It would be Christopher’s.

Was there a lot of debate in the writers’ room?

We pitched it back and forth for months and months: “Are we doing it? Can we do it? Are we insane? This will drive the fan nuts. They’ll want to watch the next season to see what happens. No, we can’t do it. Yes, we can. No, we can’t.” And by the way, it costs a lot of money, so we had to get permission from the studio and the network. Finally, when the money came through, Mike [Robin, a “Dallas” executive producer and director] and I looked at each other and said, “Oh, my God. I guess we’re really doing it.”

When was the scene filmed?

Only about three weeks ago. That we kept it secret is more incredible. At a certain point, only the writers and Mike knew, and then it became the studio, and then it became the network. Every time it went to someone else, I would freak and think, “How are you going to keep this secret?” Then we had to budget it and schedule it, and that involved a whole other film crew because our crew was not working. So we used the crew for “Major Crimes.”

You kept it in the TNT family.

They didn’t know what they were shooting. They knew there was going to be an explosion, but they had no idea what show, what character. And then when Jordana [Brewster] showed up on set, they realized, “Oh my God, we’re shooting the finale for ‘Dallas.’” We talked to them afterwards and said, “Guys, you’re so great to do this. You showed up on a Saturday. Thank you for your time. Please, please, please keep this to yourselves.”

Jesse Metcalfe gave a nice statement to Entertainment Weekly. What was Jordana’s reaction to the news?

I only told her the night before we shot it. She was shocked. At first she thought we were killing her because we wouldn’t tell her what we were shooting. So I finally told her, “Just rest easy. We’re not killing you, okay?”

It was a big twist, which is why I’m sorry it aired on such a tough night. What’s your reaction to the ratings?

Well, we held our own, which is insane since seven other shows premiered that day. There was “The Blacklist,” there was “The Voice,” there was “Monday Night Football.” Literally, I’m stunned. But we’re a DVR darling. Every episode this summer has gone up [significantly in viewers through DVR playback]. All I can do is make a show we’re proud of and hope the diehard fans show up.

Dallas, Bobby Ewing, Brave New World, Linda Gray, Patrick Duffy, Sue Ellen Ewing, TNT, Which Ewing Dies?

Brave new world

You’re still waiting to hear whether you’ll be renewed for a fourth year, but as you said the other day, you’ve already started writing next season’s storylines. So how’s Bobby going to cope with his son’s death?

I just finished the first [episode] outline and it’s all about him. How’s he dealing with this? He has a pretty good idea who did it, even though there’s absolutely no proof. And Nicolas is in Mexico, so he can’t get to him. So you’re going to see a slightly different Bobby than you’ve seen before. He’s extraordinarily angry and vengeful, he’s extraordinarily hurt — and he’s refusing to express his hurt.

What about the rest of the family?

It affects everybody. Elena’s guilt goes without saying. She feels like her hands are dirty. There’s going to be a tortured relationship between her and Bobby. Believe me, this will be the emotional core of the show. The other thing that will be at the core of it is John Ross’s sister.

Yes, let’s talk about her. What can you say?

I can tell you that although J.R. has many spawns around town — if not around the world — this girl is different and special, and there’s a reason for that. That’s going to be the surprise that I hope will make your head spin.

You’re killing me here.

We had originally filmed the scene of John Ross finding her as an alternate ending because we didn’t know if we were going to get the money to blow up the car. But because we hadn’t cast the actress, all you were going to see was [the character’s] hand, and it was a great hand. It had bitten cuticles and some chipped nails and a bunch of bracelets. It was in a very exotic location. And we shot it, and it worked, but we thought because we’re going to move forward six months [when the new season opens], it would be better if John Ross finds her then. Because what the heck is he doing with her for six months?

So who’s this character’s mother?

It was a woman. [Laughs]

That’s good to know!

She’s passed away, so we’re not going to meet her. If I tell you that, then I would be spoiling something that I think would be a lot of fun — which, by the way, has been a pitch in our writers’ room for three years. We have something called the “duck pond,” where we throw up crazy ideas. And finally, that one looked good to us this year, so we’re employing it.

Will we see more old favorites from the original show?

Yes. There will be one who is a very, very, very popular old character. We’re excited to bring him or her back.

Wait, what? You’re not going to tell me if it’s a him or a her?

[Laughs] Okay, it’s a her. We’re looking forward to that storyline. It’ll be a lot of fun.

What about Cliff Barnes? Will Ken Kercheval be back?

Maybe. We’ve used him extensively for three seasons, but he’s in jail. We decided to leave him in jail, and so that kind of hurt us a little bit. There’s not a lot he can do from there. But there are some pitches about that also.

What about this business of adding a wing onto Southfork?

We’re doing it!

Really?

It burned! We have to add a wing. [Laughs] It’s a two-bedroom house with 15 people living in it.

But what about fans like me who consider Southfork sacred ground?

That’s why we’re going to put [the addition] in the back of the house. You won’t get to see it from the front, so the silhouette of the house will remain the same. We did not want to upset anybody. But we’ve made fun of [Southfork’s size] from the beginning.

I think that’s part of the show’s charm.

Yeah, definitely. We talk about it all the time. I mean, if you’ve ever visited that house, it’s probably 2,000 square feet, but somehow there are eight bedrooms. [Laughs]

Speaking of fans: Do you pay attention to the fan sites?

Not that much because I hate to get sucked into it. I mean, I want to hear all the good ones, and I want to hear the bad ones too. Mike Robin always leads with the good news. I lead with the bad news. That’s how I want notes from the studio. That’s how I want notes from the network. Just give me the bad news and I’ll fix it.

Brave New World, Dallas, John Ross Ewing, Josh Henderson, TNT, Which Ewing Dies?

Listen up

Fans talk a lot about the show on social media. Do you do that?

No.

Why is that?

I don’t know. I feel like it’s passed me by — like I didn’t catch on at the beginning — and now my brain is so overloaded, unless I dump some “Gilligan’s Island” from my hard drive, I can’t learn anything new. But I know it’s very important, and thank goodness, all of our actors do it. They’re really into it, and they have a lot of followers. I also know the younger members of our writing staff do it. I just haven’t. Every time somebody tries to introduce me to it, I’m like, “No, I have so many emails I have to answer!”

But you hear what fans say. Is it hard to balance giving them what they want with pursuing your own creative vision for the show?

Maybe, because I’m not sure I always give the fans what they want. Maybe they’d like it to be more soapier than it is. I come from very dark writing. I wrote violent movies for Michael Mann and many other dark directors. That’s a place where I’m comfortable, and so I’ll often go to that place. Sometimes it works, and sometimes I have to remind myself that it’s probably not the best choice.

Can you give an example?

I just did it in something we were [discussing] for Season 4 about Pamela. I said, “How about she does this and this and this,” and then Robert Rovner [a “Dallas” executive producer and writer] said, “But that’s not empowering for her.” And I said, “You know what? You’re absolutely right.” I was going to a dark place for her. But I just want to work to the best of my ability, and I do want to make it delicious, and so I try never to steal that from the show.

You mentioned the “duck pond” in the writers’ room. Do I dare ask what other ideas are up there?

Most of them are goofy — and then one day they’re not goofy any more.

What I’d give to be a fly on the wall when you guys are discussing this stuff.

You have no idea. There are four comedy writers [on staff] and the things that get said inside that room — you can’t repeat them on the outside. Seriously, it’s insane. Every other day, I’m crying. We have fun. And at the end of the day, somehow the work gets done.

Share your comments below and read more interviews from Dallas Decoder.

On a Tough Night, ‘Dallas’ Takes a Hit in the Ratings

Ann Ewing, Bobby Ewing, Brenda Strong, Emma Bell, Emma Ryland, Endame, Patrick Duffy, TNT

Brace yourself, Annie

“Dallas” wrapped up its season on one of the most competitive nights of the year — and it has the numbers to prove it.

The two-hour season finale debuted September 22 to approximately 1.72 million viewers, the show’s smallest Monday audience this year, according to Nielsen. This included 560,000 adults between ages 18 and 49, a group advertisers pay top dollar to reach.

“Dallas” fans and people who work on the show were hoping it would get a lift from the much-touted finale, in which TNT promised one of the show’s main characters would be killed off.

“Could the numbers have been better? Yes, but this was a tough night to end the season on,” said Marc Berman, editor of TV Media Insights, an industry news site.

The season finale consisted of two episodes, “Endgame” and “Brave New World,” that aired from 9 to 11 p.m. in most time zones. The competition included the season premieres of NBC’s “The Voice,” which averaged 12.7 million viewers from 8 to 10, and “The Blacklist,” which drew 12.5 million viewers from 10 to 11. The debut of the CBS crime drama “Scorpion” scored 14 million viewers from 9 to 10.

On cable, “Dallas’s” competition included ESPN’s “Monday Night Football,” which averaged 13.3 million viewers throughout the evening.

“Dallas’s” September 22 audience is down about 8 percent from one week ago, when “Boxed In” debuted to 1.86 million viewers, including 540,000 viewers between ages 18 and 49. However, “Boxed In’s” total audience climbed to 2.8 million viewers when you count DVR users who recorded the episode and watched it within three days of its debut.

The other dramas on TNT’s late summer/early fall schedule aren’t faring better than “Dallas.” On September 17, the Wednesday entries “Legends” and “Franklin & Bash” drew 1.63 million and 1.52 million viewers, respectively.

Overall, “Dallas” averaged approximately 1.94 million viewers on Mondays this year, down from about 2.66 million viewers on Mondays during its second season and more than 4 million viewers during Season 1, when TNT showed it on Wednesdays.

The network hasn’t announced whether “Dallas” will be renewed for a fourth season, although executive producer Cynthia Cidre told Dallas Decoder last week that the show’s writers are cranking out scripts so the series will be ready to go into production if it’s picked up.

What do you think of “Dallas’s” latest ratings? Share your comments below and read more news from Dallas Decoder.

‘Which Ewing Dies?’ New Clues Emerge in ‘Dallas’s’ Mystery

Ann Ewing, Brenda Strong, Christopher Ewing, Dallas, Elena Ramos, Jesse Metcalfe, Jordana Brewster, Julie Gonzalo, Pamela Rebecca Barnes Ewing, TNT, Which Ewing Dies

There’s still no telling which Ewing will die during “Dallas’s” third-season finale, although executive producer Cynthia Cidre offered a helpful hint when she told Dallas Decoder the death will be storyline-driven. So whose demise would yield the most drama? Here’s how the loss of certain characters might affect the storytelling.

Ann Ewing, Brenda Strong, Dallas, TNT, Which Ewing Dies

Please don’t go, girl

Ann Ewing. Even if Bobby brings Ann and Emma home from Mexico, the gals may not be out of danger. Suppose there’s a final clash between the Ewings and the cartel and Ann gets caught in the crossfire? What if Bobby holds Harris and Judith responsible for her death and embarks on a quest for revenge? It would add another dimension to the Ewing/Ryland feud while evoking the last season of the original show, when April was murdered and Bobby became obsessed with getting revenge. Of course, Bobby’s anger after Ann’s death would probably pale in comparison to the rage Brenda Strong’s fans would feel if “Dallas” kills off Ann — and can you imagine how upset they’ll be when Bobby starts dating again? (You know he will. It usually doesn’t take Bob long to mend a broken heart.) Even though Ann’s death could open new storylines for Patrick Duffy, it would be sad to see “Dallas” lose Strong, a marvelous actress and one of the show’s biggest boosters on social media. Nevertheless, like KSiteTV points out, our beloved Annie might be the likeliest to go.

Christopher Ewing, Dallas, Jesse Metcalfe, TNT, Which Ewing Dies

Like father, like son?

Christopher Ewing. If the thought of watching Bobby lose yet another wife doesn’t put a lump in your throat, imagine what it would be like to see him lose a son. Dropping Jesse Metcalfe from “Dallas” would be shocking, although the show would undoubtedly send Christopher out in a blaze of glory. Suppose Nicolas runs afoul of the Mexican drug lord El Pozolero, who retaliates by ordering a hit on Elena — only to have Christopher take the bullet for her? It would be this “Dallas’s” version of Bobby pushing Pam out of the path of Krazy Katherine’s car, minus the “it was all a dream” twist. Once again, Bobby might blame the Rylands for bringing the cartel into the Ewings’ lives and seek revenge, giving Duffy a powerful storyline next year. Christopher’s death could also allow “Dallas” to introduce a grown-up version of Lucas, Bobby’s biological son with Jenna — and not a moment too soon. Now that Pamela, Elena and Emma have all taken turns in John Ross’s bed, aren’t the “Dallas” leading ladies going to be in the market for some fresh beefcake?

Dallas, Elena Ramos, Jordana Brewster, TNT, Which Ewing Dies

Adios, Elena?

Elena Ramos. Cidre told Dallas Decoder the character who dies is named Ewing, adding, “It’s a Ewing we know well.” This would seem to rule out Jordana Brewster’s character — unless there’s a quickie wedding between Christopher and Elena during the season finale and Elena kicks the bucket shortly thereafter. It’s true the show has set the stage for Elena to be at the center of a “who’s the daddy?” pregnancy storyline, now that she’s bedded both Nicolas and John Ross while using her Swiss cheese diaphragm. But what if all that pregnancy business is a decoy to throw fans off the Elena death trail? In Cidre’s Ultimate Dallas interview, she coyly hinted the pregnancy storyline won’t play out the way the audience expects. Could that mean it won’t play out at all? Whatever the case, as much as I like Brewster, killing off Elena could be an efficient way to get rid of the Ramoses, whom many vocal fans never warmed to. Think about it: Now that Drew is dead and Carmen has quit working for the Ewings, what’s left for Elena to do?

Dallas, Julie Gonzalo, Pamela Rebecca Barnes Ewing, TNT, Which Ewing Dies

Gone, darlin’, gone?

Pamela Barnes Ewing. Now here’s a death that would truly suck. Julie Gonzalo and her character are hugely popular, especially among fans who are clamoring to see John Ross and Pamela get back together. But what if the Bobby/Ann scenario described above happens instead to John Ross and Pamela? Suppose she dies tragically at the hands of the cartel, setting John Ross off on a mission to destroy Nicolas and/or the Rylands? What if Cliff blames John Ross for his daughter’s death and comes after him, creating a circle of vengeance? There’s also the Barnes/Ewing feud to think about. Does Cliff have other kids who might crawl out of the woodwork to do battle with the Ewings? Or what if — I can barely bring myself to write this — the show decides to drop the feud altogether? Pamela did declare it was over recently (although she also said her fight with John Ross is just beginning). I can’t imagine “Dallas” without these two families squabbling, but don’t forget the title of this season’s final hour: “Brave New World.” Could that be the biggest hint of all?

Bobby Ewing, Dallas, John Ross Ewing, Josh Henderson, Linda Gray, Sue Ellen Ewing, TNT, Which Ewing Dies

No, nope, nada

Bobby, Sue Ellen or John Ross Ewing. I refuse to entertain the thought of any of these three characters dying. It also seems unlikely the show would kill off a beloved character from the original “Dallas.” It’s hard enough to imagine losing Ann, Christopher and Pamela! If pressed, I guess I could envision a scenario in which … nope, sorry. Can’t do it.

 

 

 

Who do you think will die? Share your theories below and read more posts on Dallas Decoder’s “Which Ewing Dies?” page.

‘Which Ewing Dies?’ ‘Dallas’ Producer Offers a Tease

Christopher Ewing, Dallas, Endgame, Jesse Metcalfe, Linda Gray, Sue Ellen Ewing, TNT, Which Ewing Dies

Watch you backs, darlins

Warning: This article contains clues about the identity of the Ewing who’ll die during “Dallas’s” September 22 cliffhanger.

The character who dies in “Dallas’s” season finale is named Ewing, executive producer Cynthia Cidre told Dallas Decoder yesterday. “It’s a Ewing we know well,” she said.

Cidre declined to give additional details about the death, which has been the subject of intense speculation among fans since earlier this week, when TNT began airing a promo that promises “one Ewing will die” during the September 22 telecast.

Some fans predicted the show would kill off someone who is close to the Ewings but not necessarily a family member, but Cidre’s comments suggest this won’t be the case. She wouldn’t say if the character is played by one of the show’s main cast members, which keeps alive another fan theory — that the show will kill off someone from the original series, not one of the regular characters on TNT’s version.

The two-hour finale will be comprised of two episodes, “Endgame” and “Brave New World,” that will air back-to-back. Cidre said the death will come toward the end of the second hour, but it won’t necessarily be the last scene.

The “Dallas” producers decided to kill off the character for storyline purposes, not because the actor or actress wanted to leave, Cidre said. “It’s really what serves the story. We knew we wanted to hit something big at the end of the season. This is our first year without Larry [Hagman], and we wanted to make our own name in the ‘Dallas’ universe. It’s a pretty amazing scene,” she said.

Executives from both TNT and Warner Bros., the studio that produces “Dallas,” encouraged Cidre to go through with the death storyline when she pitched it to them. “They came back and said, ‘Trust yourselves. If you think it works, do it. … See if you can surprise [the audience] again.’”

Cidre predicted fans will be eager to see what happens to the Ewings after they lose one of their own. “New things are going to happen. There’s going to be new blood. There’s going to be new conflict. … You can’t just keep playing the same conflicts over and over again,” she said.

The two-hour finale will find “pretty much all” the characters in physical jeopardy, Cidre said. The first hour is more action-packed, while the second hour wraps up the year’s storylines before concluding with what she called “our biggest cliffhangers of all time.”

More “Dallas” dish from Cidre:

• On preparing for a fourth season: Although TNT hasn’t renewed “Dallas” for another season, the show’s writers are back at work crafting storylines in case the series gets picked up. Cidre has delivered a 60-page “bible” outlining the new storylines to TNT and Warner Bros., and the first few scripts have been written. If TNT decides to bring the show back, Cidre said the network will probably announce the renewal in October, and cameras will start rolling about six weeks later. “We still have our building, we have our stages, we’re paying rent. We just don’t have an official pickup,” she said.

• On possible fourth-season airdates: Cidre’s writing team has been told to prepare another 15-episode split season. If “Dallas” is renewed, she expects the show to follow the same schedule it did this year, with eight episodes beginning in mid-February, followed by a break and the year’s final episodes starting in August.

• On “Dallas’s” Monday time slot: Although many fans wish TNT would move “Dallas” to a less competitive night, Cidre said she doesn’t mind airing on Mondays. However, she wishes “Dallas” could follow “Major Crimes” or another one of TNT’s popular dramas. “Because our show is sexier, we do get a slightly different demographic. It would help to have a lead-in,” Cidre said.

Which Ewing will die during “Dallas’s” two-hour season finale on Monday, September 22? Share your predictions below and read more news from Dallas Decoder.

The Dallas Decoder Interview: Juan Pablo Di Pace

Dallas, Juan Pablo Di Pace, Nicolas Trevino, TNT

Juan Pablo Di Pace

Spoiler alert! “Dallas” surprised viewers this week when Juan Pablo Di Pace’s character, Nicolas Treviño, stood by and watched his partners in crime execute his lifelong friend, Drew Ramos (Kuno Becker). I spoke to Di Pace last week about Nicolas’s dark turn and what will happen next on the TNT drama.

Dude, you killed Drew!

I know, I know. I’m so happy I did. [Laughs]

How’d you find out your character was going to become a killer?

There was sense among the cast that someone was going to die. Then it became clear it was Drew, and then when I read the script, I thought, “Oh, it’s me! I’m the killer!” [Laughs] But it’s a horrible thing. He’s like Nicolas’s half-brother.

What was it like to film the big scene where Drew takes the bullet?

It was hard. The producers really wanted to show that Nicolas is this badass, cold guy. So I went there and I was really cold. I went in thinking, “OK, I’m not going to feel anything. I’m not going to cry.” And all of a sudden, in the last take, my eyes were bawling. It just felt so wrong. It’s inevitable that Nicolas would feel something because Drew’s family.

How long did that scene take to film?

Steve Robin, the director of that episode, wanted me to do it many times because he really wanted different sizes of the shot. It was a very intense half-day, but I absolutely love Kuno Becker. He’s wonderful to work with. So it was a great day, all in all. But it certainly gives Nicolas a twist. Everyone was wondering, “Is this guy a complete monster?” Yes, he is a monster.

Dallas, Juan Pablo Di Pace, Nicolas Trevino, TNT

Introducing Mr. Trevino

So when you joined the “Dallas” cast, did you know this was the direction Nicolas was going in?

Well, when I joined the show, it was very, very fast. I had just arrived in L.A. I was just breezily going through my first week [there], and then I get the call: “Put yourself on tape for ‘Dallas.’” I did that, and two days later, I’m talking to Cynthia [Cidre, the show’s executive producer]. And then a day after that, I’m in Dallas shooting. So I had no time to think about the enormity of it all. But what Cynthia did — which was great — was on that flight from L.A. to Dallas, she explained to me the whole two seasons prior, and she explained the arc of the character in Season 3.

What did she tell you about Nicolas?

She mentioned that he’s not what he seems, but I did not predict he was going to be a killer. That was definitely a big surprise for me.

Would you have preferred knowing that from the start?

In this profession, you always have to readjust. I don’t know if you remember the first season of “24,” but Nina Meyers was Jack’s sidekick, and at the end of the season, they told the actress, “Oh, by the way, you’re the mole.” So as an actor, you always want to know, but sometimes the producers don’t tell you so you don’t play what’s coming.

Dallas, Juan Pablo Di Pace, Nicolas Trevino, TNT

Boardroom debut

I have to tell you: I liked Nicolas so much as the charming rapscallion. I loved his first scene, where he breezes into the boardroom and upsets the Ewings’ apple cart.

That’s what’s fun about playing him. He has these different colors. He’s a guy with a secret, and he’s always hiding stuff. You know, in the beginning, we thought, “Elena is the one person he can tell everything to.” Not anymore. Now he has to hide the death of Drew, and that really affects Nicolas a lot. It’s stirring inside of him the rest of the season.

Well, let’s talk about his relationship with Elena. What’s up with the whole diaphragm-puncturing business?

Elena is the love of his life. I mean, that is one true thing about him. He adores her and doesn’t want to lose her, but he also knows he won’t be able to keep everything from her for very long. And when she finds out, it’s not going to be pretty. So I think the puncturing of the diaphragm is his way of securing a place in her life. Having a child together means having a connection to her that is beyond all the bad stuff that he’s doing for the cartel. It’s a twisted plan, of course. It’s very Nicolas. [Laughs]

So he’s killing people and he’s sabotaging people’s birth control. What else are we going to see him do this year?

I’d tell you but I’d have to kill you. [Laughs]

Oh, no. Nicolas is coming after me now!

I’m just going to say, toward the end of the season, it gets very exciting. The “Dallas” writers have this talent for giving you the cliffhanger, and I can tell you there’s another “Oh my God” moment before the season ends.

Dallas, Juan Pablo Di Pace, Nicolas Trevino, TNT

Connected forever?

Oh, good. So how are you enjoying working with the cast?

I love it. Jordana [Brewster] was the first person I did a scene with when I arrived, fresh off the boat. She’s just a dream to work with. And the rest of the cast is just a hoot. Julie Gonzalo is so funny. Linda Gray is the greatest woman on the planet. So beautiful and gracious. She gave me this huge hug when I finished my boardroom scene and said, “I’m so excited you’re here.” And you know, to have that hug from Sue Ellen was spectacular.

There are a lot of people who’d like to get a hug from Sue Ellen.

And then there’s Patrick Duffy. The boardroom scene was on my second day, and I was pretty nervous. It was a big speech, so I was kind of walking backwards and forwards, going through my lines, and the rest of the cast was — I won’t say distant, but giving me my space. And so Patrick comes up to me and says, “By the way, Juan, we know how freaked out you are and how difficult this is, because we’ve all been there, so we will talk to you properly in about two weeks’ time.” [Laughs] And that was so nice because when you first join a show, it’s so nerve-wracking, and you want to do the best you can. That was really sweet of him to say that.

And he directed one of the upcoming episodes. What was that like?

That man is so talented. You’ll see that. That episode is an actors’ episode. There’s a lot of confrontation and dialogue. He did an incredible job of jumping out of the director’s chair and then [acting in] these really intense scenes. It’s the kind of episode where you say, “So this is the season finale, right?” And it’s not. There are three or four more after that.

It sounds like you’re enjoying being part of this ensemble.

We’ve had so many laughs. I watched all the Oscar-nominated movies this year with Emma Bell and Brenda Strong. We went to the cinema a lot when we weren’t shooting. It’s a really chill team, and very tight as well. We’re like a family.

Dallas, Juan Pablo Di Pace, Nicolas Trevino, TNT

Suit up for more!

And what are you hearing about the show returning for a fourth year?

Well, we’re just thinking positively. It’s difficult for a lot of shows to make it to season 2 or 3, so we’re really blessed the show’s gone this far. But we’re just looking forward to going back to Dallas.

Good. Are you hopeful you’ll be part of the fourth season?

Yep, I’m hopeful. Because Nicolas’s character … I can’t tell you anything.

Well, I’m worried about the guy because once you start killing people….

Yeah, I know. He’s treading a very fine line.

Besides “Dallas,” you just completed a movie with Matthew Morrison from “Glee.” What was that like?

It was great. Matthew’s a really cool, talented guy. It’s an independent film about this guy who loses his father to cancer and can’t really deal with that, so he decides to go onto a reality show like “The Bachelorette.” So I play this guy who’s called Dunkin, and he’s his nemesis on the show. I’m playing a manipulative character, someone who’s using his charms to get what he wants, and manipulating people’s feelings to win the show.

Sounds like a fun movie. When will that come out?

It’s being prepared for the Sundance festival, so sometime early next year.

You also write and direct.

Right. I’m finishing a script that I’ve been writing for five years with a friend from Argentina. I’ve directed five or six short films and couple of music videos when I was living in the U.K. I love it. I still have to do my first feature, but right now, I’m just excited to be Nicolas. I cannot wait for people to see more of him because he’s a twisted, twisted guy.

Share your comments below and read more interviews from Dallas Decoder.

What’s Going to Happen on ‘Dallas’? EW Has the Scoop

Dallas, Elena Ramos, Jordana Brewster, TNT, Where There's Smoke

We’re shocked too, honey

“Dallas” will resume its third season on August 18 and continue airing weekly until the two-hour season finale on September 22 — but if you can’t wait until then to find out what happens on the show, head over to EW.com.

In an interview posted today, showrunner Cynthia Cidre drops several tidbits about the remaining third-season storylines. The most intriguing revelation: The summer episodes will take place over the course of about 10 days in the lives of the Ewings.

If you want to know the rest — including Cidre’s plans for a Southfork expansion if “Dallas” is renewed for a fourth season — read the full interview.

What do you think of the revelations from EW.com? Share your comments below and read more news from Dallas Decoder.

The Dallas Decoder Interview: Margaret Michaels

Dallas, Margaret Michaels, Pam Ewing

Margaret Michaels

Margaret Michaels occupies a unique place in “Dallas” history. In 1988, one year after Victoria Principal left the original series, Michaels played Pam Ewing in two scenes designed to give the character closure after her fiery car crash and disappearance from Southfork. The following season, Michaels returned for a few episodes as Jeanne O’Brien, a Pam lookalike. I spoke to her recently about her “Dallas” experiences.

Let’s start at the beginning. How did you get the role of Pam?

I have a very dear friend who was a stuntwoman and happened to be the driver who ran over Bobby in the episode where he supposedly died. She and I were visiting the set of one of Patrick Duffy’s TV movies, and when my friend introduced me to him, he asked if I was an actress. The next thing I knew, I was reading for [“Dallas” producer] Leonard Katzman.

No kidding? So Katherine Wentworth’s stunt double is friends with the other Pam Ewing?

Isn’t that funny? My friend, Linda, is such a kick. I used to go with her when she was doing stunts with [stuntman] Hal Needham. We’d watch them blow up cars in San Pedro. She’s a fun friend, let me tell you. [Laughs]

So when you met Patrick, did he remark on your resemblance to Victoria?

I don’t remember him making that comment, but he must have felt that way, otherwise I would not have met with Leonard.

Let’s talk about that. You spent a year on the daytime soap “Santa Barbara” before “Dallas.” Had anyone commented on your resemblance to Victoria before?

First of all, I think we all look like someone. And several people had said they thought we looked alike. I think if we were standing next to one another, people might not make that distinction. Yet photographically, it certainly works. And please keep in mind: I’ve never met Victoria Principal. I do have a couple of friends who know both of us, and they say we have a strong resemblance. I’ve always taken that as a compliment.

Dallas, Margaret Michaels, Pam Ewing

Once a heroine

So you read for Mr. Katzman, and then you got the part. Was it intimidating to step into the role of Pam, even if it was for just one episode?

I think it’s difficult for any actor to fill the role of a beloved character like Pam. She was established by Victoria, who was loved both as Victoria and as Pam. And so as an actor, you want to get it right. And as a fan who watched the show, you really, really want to be believable. So I understood the importance of that scene.

Ah, so you were a fan of the show?

Absolutely! I think everyone I knew was a fan of “Dallas.”

That’s very cool! Your familiarity with the show must have been helpful to you in preparing for the role.

It was, certainly. I already knew that Bobby was the love of Pam’s life. I knew that stepping away from your child in order to save them from more heartbreak had to be probably one of the most difficult decisions she would ever make. And I also knew that her love for and bond with her brother Cliff would make seeing him again almost impossible. That’s a tremendous amount of information for an actor to go into a scene with. So for me, I think having created the raspy voice, in addition to the scars on my neck and face, probably made it easier for me to slide into that role.

Oh, interesting. You changed your voice for the scene?

I did. I tried to mimic that of a burn victim because, of course, Pam’s crash was an absolute explosion of fire. I’ve always found it amazing that anyone could have survived it.

Yes. She’s a miracle woman!

But that kind of intense fire, it doesn’t just disfigure a person’s face, it damages their vocal cords. So I tried to make [my voice] a little raspy, so there wasn’t clarity to each sentence. I’ve had family members who were with the fire department, and my husband had a very good friend who ran a burn center. And when someone has had a tremendous insult to their vocal cords, it alters the sound of their voice.

You also mentioned the makeup you wore. Was that very involved?

Very involved, and that’s why I applaud the makeup department. It takes a long time to build that kind of scar tissue on the neck and face. Actually, that may have taken as long as doing the scene.

So what was it like to actually film the scene? It’s a heartbreaking moment — Pam telling Cliff she never wants to see him again.

The thing that pops into my mind first is walking onto that set and how quiet and respectful it was. That’s not always the case when you walk onto a set, until they start rolling. Michael Preece was directing that episode — and wow, Michael is truly an actor’s director. And Ken Kercheval is really a wonderful actor. He was so real. It was difficult to hold in all those emotions as Pam while watching Cliff plead for his sister to come back home.

And then Cliff walks away, and Pam is left alone with her doctor — and that’s when the audience learns she’s dying and sent Cliff away to protect him from the truth.

The wonderful part of that was it allowed me to take all this pinned up emotion from my scene with Ken and take it into the next scene with the doctor.

It sounds like you really enjoyed working with him.

The whole experience was wonderful — solemn, but wonderful. I have to tell you: On the day we shot this and I walked onto that set, I had to wonder how it was for the crew. For years, they worked with one actress as Pamela Ewing, and then suddenly they’re presented with a scene where both the character and the storyline have closure, and an entirely different person steps into the role. But the crew was lovely.

So what kind of reaction did you receive after that episode aired? Did you hear from fans?

I did. It was odd because I already had a fan base from “Santa Barbara,” and there were people who wrote and were very positive. I was thankful for that. Yet I also think this was really difficult for people who were true fans of Victoria and Pam to accept me in this role, and I think that’s completely understandable.

Dallas, Margaret Michaels, Pam Ewing

Repeat performance

Well, the producers must have liked what they saw because they invited you to return the following season as Pam’s double, Jeanne.

I was completely surprised when that happened. It was an out of the blue phone call. They asked, “Would you want to come back and do this character, Jeanne O’Brien?” And I thought, “Of course.” No one even questions that. It was a wonderful set to work on.

How did playing Jeanne compare to playing Pam?

It’s totally different than coming in and taking over a role that someone else created. Now you get to create all the nuances of Jeanne O’Brien. Each time I got a script, there was another layer of her personality. In my mind, I think she was trying so desperately to climb that ladder of success without really knowing who she was. I think she was very ambitious, and I do not think she was prepared for a guy like Bobby Ewing. It’s sort of like having your knight in shining armor arrive, only to realize the knight belongs to someone else, and there’s nothing you can do about it. [Laughs]

Jeanne was quite a bit different from Pam, wasn’t she?

There was that one scene in her house where she attempts to transform herself into Pam and seduces Bobby. When I got that script and read that scene, it was the first time I thought she had a darker, more manipulative, almost desperate side to herself. Because initially, she was all over the place. She was a smart real estate woman, and then all of a sudden she was the cute, sweet little date, and now I’ve got a scene where she tries to look exactly like his ex-wife. You have to wonder: What type of personality makes that choice?

Bobby Ewing, Dallas, Jeanne O'Brien, Margaret Michaels

Seeing double

And when you played Jeanne, you finally got to work with Patrick.

I absolutely loved him. He is just a wonderful human being. He’s kind and nurturing, and as an actor, he’s talented and giving. Every single time I worked with him was just pure joy.

He and Larry Hagman were famous for their practical jokes on the set. Were you ever a victim of their pranks?

Was I a victim? [Laughs] Let me tell you, it wasn’t just Larry and Patrick. It was also Ken Kercheval.

Oh, really? I haven’t heard about him before.

I don’t think Ken orchestrated anything, but he wasn’t adverse to being the quiet participant who didn’t give me a heads up. There were actually a few times where I felt like I was in the Abbott and Costello routine, “Who’s on First?” And trust me: When you’re the new kid on the show, you are not on first.

Ken also directed one of the Jeanne O’Brien episodes.

He did. He directed that darker scene where Jeanne seduces Bobby. And Larry of course directed one [of the other episodes], and as directors, both Ken and Larry were exceptional. They knew exactly what they wanted. Because they played key characters on “Dallas,” their insight into the show worked very well for them behind the lens.

Dallas, Larry Hagman, Margaret Michaels, Patrick Duffy

Who’s on first?

Do you stay in touch with any of the cast members?

I have friends who have run into Patrick and I think, “Why don’t I ever run into Patrick?” [Laughs] But I have to tell you: My husband and I were once boarding a flight from New York, and Larry and his wife were on the same flight with us. So I had an opportunity to fly from New York to L.A. and chat with him. This was years ago, and I’m always grateful now that he’s gone that I had an opportunity to spend a little bit of time with him.

So on the new “Dallas,” Pam is supposed to be dead, but a lot of fans are hoping she’ll come back — and many of them would be very happy to see you in the role.

First, I’m flattered to hear that. I was a fan of the old “Dallas” and I’m a fan of the new “Dallas.” I just love Josh Henderson and Jesse Metcalfe. They are so wonderful. I love Elena and Pamela. I adore Sue Ellen. I like her so much now because she has come into her own. And of course, like all the fans, I was hoping for that J.R./Sue Ellen reunion. Oh, and I have to tell you this, because I love this so much: I think having Cliff Barnes return as the mega-wealthy villain is pure genius.

Isn’t he great on the new show?

He’s fabulous. And Patrick’s character has layers upon layers. Bobby’s really grown into his own. I love how strong he is, and I love how he has a little bit of bad boy in him now. I think that’s a good thing for him. And you talk about Pam, but I have to tell you: I really like Bobby and Ann. I think she’s wonderful.

Oh, how nice!

So as for Pam returning? This is the only way I know how to put this: In life, we miss our family members that we lose. And art imitates life, and fans miss the characters that they lose — yet it doesn’t always mean we get them back. I think Cynthia Cidre knows exactly what she’s doing.

Nicely stated, but what about Jeanne? Would you ever be interested in playing that role again?

Oh, yeah. Sure. She’s a fun gal.

Dallas, Margaret Michaels, Pam Ewing

Never settle

What do you think became of Jeanne? Where do you suppose she is today?

[Laughs] Well, I don’t think Jeanne would have settled for the mundane. Knowing her, I think she probably married an older, wealthy businessman who probably taught her everything she needed to know about the corporate world. And by now, I would think she’s either divorced, maybe widowed. Regardless, I think she’s certainly doing well on her own.

And what about Margaret Michaels? Can you tell us what you’re up to these days?

Oh, sure. I actually changed my focus and started putting my creative energy in writing. I had so many stories and ideas pinned up in my brain for so long, so I decided to put them on paper. So I have a couple of production companies. I have two partners, and we have a feature that’s ready to go. I also wrote a television movie for the holiday season, and I created a series. I’ve already written the pilot, and three episodes are finished. I know all the little twists and turns and where the characters are going. I just wish all the ideas would float out of my head and download themselves onto my USB without my having to type anything. [Laughs]

Are these projects “Dallas” fans can see soon?

I’m talking to people. This is an interesting business. My feeling is this: When you’re shooting it, then you know it’s a done deal. Until then, it’s all conversation and negotiation.

Spoken like a smart businesswoman. Jeanne would be proud!

[Laughs] Well, I just truly love doing this. I enjoy every moment of the process.

Share your comments below and read more interviews from Dallas Decoder.

Melinda Clarke to Play Tracey McKay on ‘Dallas’

Dallas, Melinda Clarke, Tracey McKay, TNT

Melinda Clarke (Getty Images)

“Dallas” has cast Melinda Clarke as Tracey McKay, one of Bobby Ewing’s girlfriends from the original series. Clarke will appear on the TNT drama during the second half of the third season, which resumes Monday, August 18.

Tracey was introduced during the original “Dallas’s” 12th season and was played by Beth Toussaint. The character is the daughter of Ewing rival Carter McKay, played by George Kennedy, and was briefly romanced by Bobby (Patrick Duffy), but the affair ended when he tangled with Tracey’s drug-dealing brother Tommy, played by J. Eddie Peck. Tracey briefly returned to the series the following season when Tommy was killed off.

This season, TNT’s “Dallas” introduced Carter’s grandson Hunter (Fran Kranz), a childhood friend of John Ross and Christopher’s who is secretly helping Nicolas (Juan Pablo Di Pace) with his scheme against the Ewings.

A TNT spokeswoman confirmed the casting of Clarke, who is best known for her roles on “The O.C.” and “Nikita,” along with a recurring gig on “C.S.I.: Crime Scene Investigation” as Lady Heather, a dominatrix. Clarke also appeared alongside Julie Gonzalo in episodes of “Nikita” and “Eli Stone.”

TNT has provided no details on Tracey’s storyline, although showrunner Cynthia Cidre previously hinted one of Bobby’s old flames could return and provide a new obstacle for him and Ann (Brenda Strong). Ultimate Dallas reported the character’s return yesterday.

There’s also no word on why Toussaint isn’t returning as Tracey. Toussaint’s most recent television role was on “The Young and the Restless” in 2006, according to her IMDb profile.

What do you think of Melinda Clarke’s casting as Tracey McKay? Share your comments below and read more news from Dallas Decoder.